Jeffrey Cain

Whispering Thunder (Raccoon 1972)

http://www.mediafire.com/?ejytyiekxjm

Not much is known about Jeffrey Cain other than the fact that he released two albums, For You and Whispering Thunder, for Jesse Colin Young’s Warner Bros. imprint Raccoon records. the Raccoon label was responsible for some of the greatest sides of hippie soul and country folk released in the 70s. It boasted a roster of Jesse Colin Young, Michael Hurley and the Youngbloods. (Note: if anyone has any music by other Raccoon artists Banana and the Bunch, Joe Bauer, Kenny Gill or High Country, email me at magicistragic21@yahoo.com)

This is his second album and it should appeal to fans of Loudon Wainwright’s early work since both artists use country and folk as a canvas for their own bitter, biting observations. Bob Dylan and the Youngbloods are also strong influences although he is more enamoured of southern-fried rock and roll licks on many of the tracks. He is at his best on the opener “Soul Train” which is blue eyed soul by way of Nashville. Love this track and it stands as one of the best twangy tracks of the early 70s. “Pack Up Your Sorrows” is a heartbreakingly simple tune that offers a sentiment straight out of a Hallmark card. However, his request that a lover pack up her sorrows and share her burden with him just gets me all choked up. On a slightly negative note, I get the sense that his odes to moonshine and farming are somewhat tongue in cheek, but that is just my own paranoia. Like down home country by way of Woodstock? Whispering Thunder is right up your alley.

Jesse Colin Young

Live at Sausalito Record Plant 7/25/1975

http://www.mediafire.com/?jqzekwnkxdp

I first encountered this lovely slice of stoned country-folk on a warm June evening where a friend roasted some fish and we imbibed to our heart’s content. It was a lively night where we all bid farewell to a close friend and we listened to mellow sounds and shot the shit. Discussion shifted to the Youngbloods and the genius of the first few Jesse Colin Young records. He replied that he had to play this bootleg of his mid 70s work that included a ten minute opus about the joys of living on a ridgetop. It was creatively entitled “Ridgetop.”

“Ridgetop” deserved in own genre or a place in the pantheon of rock epics as it begins with a sultry slice of saxophone while another tickles the keys like there is some serious foreplay happening before everyone gets down to some boogie rock business. It reminds me of Tony Joe White making sweet love Michael McDonald. It is so smooth, yet fried as he shares his desire to escape humanity and live near a squirrel sanctuary and embrace the simple life. It is so overblown for such a humble sentiment. The rest of the bootleg is just as good. If your old lady or man loves some twang, pop this one on and make pretend it is Barry White.