Somehow I’ve made it five years without giving up on this ramshackle miss-mosh of reviews. I came close to scrubbing this site clean on numerous occasions, but something keeps me doing this now and again. Much love and appreciation to all the folks who visited us and even sent along some kind words. Anyhow, let’s not gush. Here is our latest in a long line of monthly mixes.

Magicistragic Mix for June

http://www4.zippyshare.com/v/66921494/file.html

Joao Gilberto-Aguas De Marco

Swamp Dogg-Do You Believe

Electric Wizard-Vinum Sabbathi

Charlambides-Those Who Walk

Adolescents-Kids of the Black Hole

Endless Boogie-Taking out the Trash

The Breeders-Safari

My Bloody Valentine-(When You Wake) You’re Still in a Dream(Peel Session 1998)

Phil Yost-Bent City I

Beaches-Dune

Wire-The 15th

Eddy Current Suppression Ring-Wrapped Up

The Woolen Men-Her Careers

John Maus-Hey Moon

Lyme and Cybelle-Follow Me

Royal Trux-Back to School

Morly Grey-After Me Again

Killing Joke-Eighties

Glass Candy-Beautiful Object

The Dovers-What Am I Going to Do?

Youtube jamboree

June 5, 2010

Aw hell, I understand if you thought I broke my promise of regular posting. God knows I talk a lot of shit without a plastic bag handy, but I’ve been obsessed with youtube lately and have compiled a laundry list of videos that cover the gamut from Philip K. Dick and Francis Bacon documentaries to live Wire and Hawkwind videos. I figure this obsession will pass in a few days and I will get back to rambling about albums, but go visit the following link

http://board.crewcial.org/thread/view/345654/&p=272

Angry Angles-Singles

October 30, 2008

Angry Angles

Singles x 3 (Various labels)

http://www.mediafire.com/?1yvwwzymtm9

Although Jay Reatard’s recent singles for Matador are about as enticing as a pickle injected with mayonnaise, I really loved much of Blood Visions as well as his work with the Reatards and Lost Sounds. At his best, he has a knack for penning punk anthems ala Killed by Death and the Adverts while adding his own oddball touches to the proceedings. His music is catchy, well-played, aggressive and epitomizes all that is wonderful about a three minute burst of anger and alienation. A lesser known offshoot of Mr. Reatard’s creativity is the Angry Angles, but their first three singles are just as addictive as his best work. It doesn’t stray far from the sound of Blood Visions, but its artsy-fartsy view of punk owes more to the Urinals and Screamers than the Adverts. There isn’t a need to pontificate upon its merits because it is just a simple, but enjoyably spastic listen that sticks in your craw. However, their cover of Wire’s “The 15th” is one of the best Wire covers ever recorded as it captures the cold worldview and resignation to cruel fate of the original.


Oblivians-Sympathy Sessions

October 14, 2008

Oblivians

Sympathy Sessions (Sympathy for the Record Industry 1996)

http://www.mediafire.com/?4wozdutmtii

Outside of the Buzzcocks, Undertones and Stiff Little Fingers, I never really got into the poppy punk anthems of contemporaries like the Clash and Ramones. All of the 77-82 punk bands have moments which leave me humming like the fool I am, but I feel more kinship with those who twisted it into grubbier forms. Whether it be the bizarro concoctions on Wire’s first three albums or the Killed by Death series, punk just seemed like it should be alien, aggressive and ugly in its own beautiful manner. My wussy teen years led me to ignore the 60s Nuggets, Pebbles and Back from the Grave comps, but they felt like a stirring slap in the face once I heard the roots on punk in all its catchy and primitive glory.

One of the bands that opened my eyes to the gruff history of punk were the Oblivians. At the time, I had no inkling of their influences and garage rock had more to do with Animal House than anything else. However, their debut singles and eps captured what I always wanted from a punk band. It had a nasty streak a mile wide and the band played the living shit out of each song.  It was fast, shitty-sounding and their live set was a simple reminder that rock and roll can stir you like a gospel anthem in a church full of hopped up folks speaking in tongues.

Sympathy Sessions collects their early singles and eps for the Sympathy label and includes some of their absolute peaks and only a few meager valleys. Their collaboration with Quintron stands as the pinnacle of their career, but this is a great representation of what made them so immediate and special. No frills or ambition to make a grand statement; Sympathy Sessions is a reminder of punk’s kinship with 60s rock, gospel, R&B and the power of a bad attitude. It is a revival session for folks with a hankering for trouble.

Bailter Space-Robot World

August 4, 2008

Bailter Space

Robot World (Matador 1993)

http://www.mediafire.com/?boliwozyzhr

How in the hell did they pull this one out of their hat? A New Zealand band assembled after the breakup of the Gordons, Bailter Space released a couple albums that built upon their loud, hypnotic psych perfected by their previous band. I love the Gordons and Bailter Space’s Thermos and Tanker Lps and their shaggy dog take on Sonic Youth’s Sister and Evol albums. These albums just grooved as the rhythm section peaked alongside each wave of feedback. I was hooked, but unprepared for what came next.

Bailter Space signed to the Matador label. Since Gerard Cosloy was always a big supporter of the Flyinmg Nun label and New Zealand pop in general, it was not much of a surprise. What was urprising was how the band somewhat abandoned their musical blueprint and borrowed a few pages from My Bloody Valentine’s Loveless, Wire’s 154 and Chairs Missing and recorded an industrial strength shoegaze album. Now, this album bears little resemblance to the the ethereal muckity-muck of the era, but it does duplicate the amniotic sac of sound of the genre and transforms it into a cold, harsh space.

I always thought that Sonic Youth’s Daydream Nation was the perfect soundtrack to the claustrophobia of life in the city. I tend to view things from this perspective since I grew up in the city and always looked for sounds that emulated my surroundings. “Teenage Riot” “Silver Rocket” and especially “Hyperstation” really spoke to my teenage self as I worked as a bicycle messenger in Philly. I’m sure other albums could serve as a substitute, but this encapsulated the dread of life under Reagan and Bush in a way i understood.

I still am dumbfounded that a group from New Zealand almost beat this band at their own game, but they did. Robot World is such a dense, thick slab of music. The bass overtakes most of the vocals and drives each song along to each depressing conclusion. It is almost depressing to a level of Joy Division and sort of reminds me of how modern bands like Jesu have attempted a synthesis of metal and shoegaze. Half of this album fails to live up to these words, but the rest was so far ahead of its time. It still sounds fresh today and would probably garner more respect today than at its release date. I thoroughly love every narcotic, emotionless second of Robot World and hope you will as well.

Various Artists

Killed by Death: Volume One

http://www.mediafire.com/?jdyu7mmbtwl

Johan Kugelberg is somewhat or directly responsible for many things that I love in life: Ugly Things magazine, The Monks reissue and the major label debut of Thomas Jefferson Slave Apartments and V-3 as well as his crowning achievement, the first four volumes of Killed by Death.

The early Killed by Death comps document punk’s most belligerent and brilliant moments circa 1977-1982, but later comps piss in the bathwater and shine a light on lesser mortals. However, the first four volumes may be the most primal collections of punk I’ve heard. It belongs next to the Nuggets, Pebbles and Back to the Grave compilations as a logical extension to their documentation of the rawest nubs of rock. You can hear the groundwork for hardcore and other offshoots of punk in each track. However, these tracks bear little resemblance to British punks like the Clash, Sex Pistols, Buzzcocks and the Damned. The Ramones, Dead Boys, Voidoids, Dickies and Pagans were more up their alley.

Punk has always been a singles scene for me. Outside of the Wipers, Wire, Clash, Pere Ubu, Drive Like Jehu, Cheater Slicks, Oblivians, Saints and Real Kids, I cannot name many punk albums that I will listen from end to end without complaint. Therefore, these comps appeal to me because they skim the fat and leave us with the most lean, deserate sounds of American punk. Personally, I strongly believe the first volume of Killed by Death is flawless in every way. It captures the crude, ham-fisted glory of all that was great about this era in music.

Aphex Twin

Donkey Rhubarb ep (Warp/Sire 1995)

http://www.mediafire.com/?0bidmzbjzmv

Man, I still am amenable to spending a couple hours listening to Aphex Twin’s Selected Ambient Works Volume II. Every buzz and drone sings to my weary soul. Love it just as much as the day I picked it up from a godforsaken Western PA chain store on the day of its release. Now, I like most of his ouvre, but everything he released after this ep makes me wish he expanded on the themes and ideas located here. Donkey Rhubarbs is the most concise summary of all that was good about Richard D. James before he began giggling in his tank and posing for the Wire with pantyhose over his noggin.

Each of the four tracks represent four sides of Aphex Twin. The last two tracks are perfect summations of his rapidfire take on idm, Detroit techno and acid while the openers explore terrain that was sadly abandoned.

“Pancake Lizard” starts the ep in dramatic fashion. It actually redeems trip-hop as a genre instead of the 99-pound weakling it truly was. Outside of Portishead and possiblly Tricky’s debut, name me one worthwhile trip-hop album. Slowed down hip-hop beats, limp drones and diva rejects abounded in this misguided genre. However, Aphex Twin treats the genre like a soundtrack as he melds the slow-motion drama of Selected Ambient Works and grafts it to a simple, but effective beat that ultimately wields all of the tension trip-hop lacked.

However, “Icct Hedral” is the one that really hurts. Why couldn’t he have explored the world of George Crumb, Philip Glass, Steve Reich and Lalo Schifrin as he does here. This collaboration with Glass is breathtaking and frustrating because he never really delved into classical music in such a way ever again. From the forboding chorus and thick bass to the delicate idm tinkling replicated by a string section, this track shows a side of Richard D. James that could’ve been groundbreaking. Before anyone complains, he did use strings and incorporate elements of classical music into his music, but this track is a grandiose moment that points to what should have been. Instead, his attention span got the better of him and jokey drill and bass was the next step.