Magicistragic Mix Number Four

February 25, 2012

Magicistragic Mix Number Four

http://www.mediafire.com/?4bzj1a6ga7u79iu

I’m going to keep this a regular feature on this blog since I only get time to pontificate once a week here, but there is so much more to share in this grand and wonderful world. Consider these to be a series of entryways to the musical wormholes I hope you explore on your own. Anyhow, this one is a bit shorter than the last, but it is a lovely place to while away a lazy hour pondering the lazy pace of a rainy night like the one enveloping my home at this very moment. By the way, please friend magicistragic on facebook if you get a moment if you would like to receive more frequent missives and youtube clips of lonely souls who are not forgotten in my neck of the woods.

Willis Alan Ramsay-Ballad of Spider John

Bubble Puppy-Hot Smoke and Sassafrass

Carol Kleyn-Love’s Goin’ Round

Virgil Caine-The Great Lunar Oil Strike

Stephen Malkmus and the Jicks-Ramp of Death

Sagittarius-Song to the Magic Frog(Will You Ever Know)

Cass Mccombs-AIDS in Africa

Shrimp Boat-What Do You Think of Love?

Baden Powell-Canto do Cobollo Preda Petra

Bobby Whitlock-The Dreams of a Hobo

The Ify Jerry Crusade-Nwantini/Die Die

Ofege-It’s Not Easy

Sleepy Labeef-Pork Salad Annie

Creme Soda-Tonight

Jerry Jackson

Shrimp Boats A-Comin’, There’s Dancin’ Tonight (Bear Family 1990)

http://www.divshare.com/download/4814985-cdb

There was something so refined, soulful and stately about the 60s r&b/soul recordings from singers with their roots in gospel. James Carr, Solomon Burke, Sam Cooke, Al Green and Ben E. King were strongly influenced by their experiences as preachers and choir members. Excluding Al Green, whose music always treated religion and raw sexuality as the same thing, their music possessed a spiritual quality that even laced their romantic appeals and sad serenades.

A lesser known, but worthy contemporary of these gentlemen is Jerry Jackson. Jackson got his start as a Brill Building songwriter whose songs were recorded by Perry Como of all people.He had some minor hits and was more popular in the England’s Northern Soul scene and Jamaica. The Kapp label signed him and tried to mold him in the image of The Drifters and Ben E. King and it was a good fit for his optimistic crooning. His cover of Bob Dylan’s “Blowin’ in the Wind” is yet another in a long line of lame 60s covers of his work, but the rest compare favorably to Sam Cooke’s ballads of the early 60s, but cannot hold a candle to his more rambunctious tunes. Overall, he’s got a really smooth, elegant voice and his selection of songs really should interest anyone in love with the giants of the era.