Ben E. King

Spanish Harlem/Don’t Play That Song (Atco 1961/1962)

http://www.divshare.com/download/5396815-043

Ben E. King’s rendition of “Spanish Harlem” has always sparked a fire in the romantic side of this jaded fuddy-duddy due to its uncanny Vulcan mindmeld of 50s pop orchestration, 60s soul and simple, but poetic tales that never fail to inspire memories of lost loves. It is a perfect song. Maybe this has something to do with Phil Spector’s involvement in transforming simplicity into complexity, but I always believed that this was King’s only foray into Spanish/Latino influences and Les Baxter inspired exotica. Thankfully, I was painfully wrong and picked up this two-fer of his early work that contains moments that delve into the cha-cha while delivering flawless fakeries that suggest a night in Spain without an ounce of truth. This is not an insult because King delivers some really moving performances of love struck tales over some really dramatic instrumentation that attempts to deliver infinite variations on the mood of “Spanish Harlem.”

The songs occasionally pay a little too much lip service to senoritas and siestas, but this collection makes my heart ache for the days of songwriting teams devoted to the craft of pop.  Lieber & Stoller, Goffin & King among others contribute to the creation of a gloriously square interpretation of Spanish soul that renders me disgusted by today’s version of the hired hand.

The other side of the two-fer, Don’t Play the Song, mostly abandons the Latino trimmings and aims straight for Sam Cooke territory. However, it lacks the sweaty grit of Cooke’s live recordings and aims for the silky-smooth moments of his most popular tunes. It is more “You Send Me” than “Don’t Fight It, Feel It” as he enters crooner territory with all the velvet, suede and whatever smooth substances I can muster in these fleeting moments.  It belongs alongside the many moments recorded by the Stax, Atco and Motown labels that break my heart with a forceful cry, tale of woe or smooth enticement towards the wrong decison. If you only know Ben E. King from “Spanish Harlem” or “Lean on Me” then listen to this and discover why he deserves to be placed alongside James Carr, Solomon Burke, O.V. Wright and other geniuses of his time.

Jerry Jackson

Shrimp Boats A-Comin’, There’s Dancin’ Tonight (Bear Family 1990)

http://www.divshare.com/download/4814985-cdb

There was something so refined, soulful and stately about the 60s r&b/soul recordings from singers with their roots in gospel. James Carr, Solomon Burke, Sam Cooke, Al Green and Ben E. King were strongly influenced by their experiences as preachers and choir members. Excluding Al Green, whose music always treated religion and raw sexuality as the same thing, their music possessed a spiritual quality that even laced their romantic appeals and sad serenades.

A lesser known, but worthy contemporary of these gentlemen is Jerry Jackson. Jackson got his start as a Brill Building songwriter whose songs were recorded by Perry Como of all people.He had some minor hits and was more popular in the England’s Northern Soul scene and Jamaica. The Kapp label signed him and tried to mold him in the image of The Drifters and Ben E. King and it was a good fit for his optimistic crooning. His cover of Bob Dylan’s “Blowin’ in the Wind” is yet another in a long line of lame 60s covers of his work, but the rest compare favorably to Sam Cooke’s ballads of the early 60s, but cannot hold a candle to his more rambunctious tunes. Overall, he’s got a really smooth, elegant voice and his selection of songs really should interest anyone in love with the giants of the era.